Horus

Horus is regarded as the god of the sky, war and hunting; the protector of Egypt. He is most notably described as having the head of a falcon. His is the story of birth, rebirth, and rejuvenation. When Set murdered Osiris to assume the throne, Isis gathered her husband’s dismembered body back together long enough to conceive a successor. She hid away to give birth and raise her son, Horus. When the young god came of age he attempted to make his rightful claim to the throne. Thus began a perpetual battle between Horus and Set for the fate of Egypt. After the years long war between them, Horus eventually prevailed, proving himself the more worthy for earning it without having to kill.

In Jason’s play, The Tomorrow Man, Horus is envisioned as a black youth, unwittingly set on a path to discovering his true parentage when a run in with law enforcement goes awry. Being raised by his adoptive parents, amidst a culture of racial tensions, travel bans and deportations; in a city on the brink of tearing itself apart, coming to terms with the revelation that he has the power of the gods is the easy part. Deciding what to do with that power, however, that is another story altogether.

HORUS or THE TOMORROW MAN by Jason Mendez
Directed by Sara Judge
Staged Reading on October 4, 2017 at the EXIT Theatre

Stacey Beckley (Stage Directions)

Brianna Cala (Alex)

Michael Curry (Connor)

Ellen Dunphy (Reporter 1)

Kai Morrison (Anthony Caine)

Mike Ottum (Reporter 2)

Kaeli Quick (Assistant Principal/Janice)

Terrance Smith (Bully)

Michael Welland (Officer)

Alison Whismore (Maggie Caine)

Jason Mendez is a storyteller. His stories have been produced in graphic novels, short films, and plays. This is his second time writing for the SF Olympians Festival.”

The image of Horus was created by Brett Grunig.